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Is Clear Water Always Balanced Water?

banner-servicesWhen it comes to pool water, we always want ours to be clean and clear, but does that mean it’s properly balanced? Not always. If your pool water is cloudy or green, then the problem becomes more obvious to see, but having clean looking water may not mean that the chemical balance is right on.

Non chemically balanced water can be uncomfortable to swim in and can actually damage your pool. Ideally you want your water to not be too basic nor too acidic, and this can be tested by looking at the pH level of the water itself. Test kits not only tell you the pH but also the alkalinity factor and the calcium factor of the water.

If the pH measures lower than 7.0 the water is considered acidic and it will attack and dissolve metals especially in any copper piping in the heat exchanger located in the pool heater. Furthermore if the saturation index is negative, the water can attack and/or dissolve calcium that is found in the pool shell and the plaster or the grouting between tiles.

Having a pH level below 7.0 or above 8.0 can irritate the eyes of swimmers. A combined chlorine level above .5 ppm can also irritate eyes which is why the chemical combinations must be in a safe range at all times.

Water clarity itself is a result of proper chemical balance. You can, however have proper chemical readings and still have cloudy water. If this is the case it may have more to do with your filter and pump than it does with your chemicals. If your pump isn’t working efficiently, even if it is running all the time, it won’t thoroughly move and clean the pool water. Having a large number of swimmers at one time and the temperature can also be factors in cloudy water, even if the chemical readings are at normal levels.

Another worry with unbalanced pool water is that over time, scale can build up and this can eventually lead to clogged filters which in turn strains the motor of your pump and can ultimately burn out your equipment long before it’s due to be replaced.

The takeaway from all of this is yes, the water may look clean and clear, but you still have to check it each week and change up the chemical routine if it isn’t reading at perfect levels. Having clean water goes a lot further than having it nice to look at, and with balanced water you can have both looks and functionality all summer long.

When it comes to pool water, we always want ours to be clean and clear, but does that mean it’s properly balanced? Not always. If your pool water is cloudy or green, then the problem becomes more obvious to see, but having clean looking water may not mean that the chemical balance is right on.

Non chemically balanced water can be uncomfortable to swim in and can actually damage your pool. Ideally you want your water to not be too basic nor too acidic, and this can be tested by looking at the pH level of the water itself. Test kits not only tell you the pH but also the alkalinity factor and the calcium factor of the water.

If the pH measures lower than 7.0 the water is considered acidic and it will attack and dissolve metals especially in any copper piping in the heat exchanger located in the pool heater. Furthermore if the saturation index is negative, the water can attack and/or dissolve calcium that is found in the pool shell and the plaster or the grouting between tiles.

Having a pH level below 7.0 or above 8.0 can irritate the eyes of swimmers. A combined chlorine level above .5 ppm can also irritate eyes which is why the chemical combinations must be in a safe range at all times.

Water clarity itself is a result of proper chemical balance. You can, however have proper chemical readings and still have cloudy water. If this is the case it may have more to do with your filter and pump than it does with your chemicals. If your pump isn’t working efficiently, even if it is running all the time, it won’t thoroughly move and clean the pool water. Having a large number of swimmers at one time and the temperature can also be factors in cloudy water, even if the chemical readings are at normal levels.

Another worry with unbalanced pool water is that over time, scale can build up and this can eventually lead to clogged filters which in turn strains the motor of your pump and can ultimately burn out your equipment long before it’s due to be replaced.

The takeaway from all of this is yes, the water may look clean and clear, but you still have to check it each week and change up the chemical routine if it isn’t reading at perfect levels. Having clean water goes a lot further than having it nice to look at, and with balanced water you can have both looks and functionality all summer long.